About

The Memoirs of a Yo-Yo Dieter

I’ve heard from self-help books and various twelve-step programs that the first step to healing, to changing oneself, is acknowledging that you have a problem. Acceptance of that problem allows you to face it head on. Well, that sounds easy enough.

Hi, my name is Tori and I’m a chronic dieter.

Welcome to my world.

21 thoughts on “About

  1. Your story has truly touched me, and I can totally relate to you on this….Food can be one of the most dangerous and comforting drugs. I have fought weight issues back and fourth along with guilt, self loathing, as well abuse from others because of it since i was 12 years old. Hardest part is getting up out of the mire and making the first step (i’m still working towards getting fully out of it, but one foot in front of the other eh? :).

    I tell myself everyday to enjoy who you are today, look forward to who you are tomorrow…and (try) love who you were yesterday.

    Keep your chin up girl, you got this :)

  2. Hey. I read about your weight loss Journey from HuffingtonPost and I want to say congratulations. Your story was very inspirational.

    I hope those who are still struggling can learn from you. It’s all about eating clean and do some exercise. Pills, crazy diets, etc… are a waste of time. It’s the pattern I’ve notice in pretty much all the weight loss success story I’ve read.

    • You’re absolutely right. While laxatives and diuretics provide short term “success,” they don’t last. The weight jumps right back up the moment you eat/drink like normal. I completely agree that true weight loss (and maintained fitness) is the result of healthy eating, exercise, and self-control.

  3. I am a foodaholic!!!!!!! Over the last year I had been working out and eating right. Lost 47 pounds. Was so proud of myself. Then stress came and I have gained back all weight, plus some. Now I feel horrible, fat, and ugly. I will Not give up or give in!!

    • Never give up! You can’t give up on your good health and well being!

      You are not horrible, fat, or ugly. You’re a beautiful woman that enjoys food. Work with that! Find healthy and creative alternatives to your favorite foods! Sneak in exercise.

      I have a rule at work: every time I use the ladies room, I do 10 push-ups against the counter before I leave. When I heat up my lunch in the break room, I do squats as the microwave counts down.

      You can do this, Anna!

  4. your story is a true inspiration to me I find myself 30lbs heavier in less than a year and some days are harder than others its nice to know Im not alone someone, somewhere knows what Im feeling and you know what I feel better and I know Im going to be okay.

  5. What you’ve done for yourself is fantastic and you deserve to be happy and healthy. I’ve struggled with much weight my whole life but never with morbid obesity until after June 2007. My fiance and I were mugged and he as beaten to death in front of me. I can’t put into words what this did to me. I locked myself away with food. I now weigh 300, not quite my highest. I was 350 when I had my daughter in April 2011. I’ve dieted for decades but I’m not dieting this time. I’m making a lifestyle change. Of course I said this before too lol. I did lose 80 pounds when I did but I didn’t stick with it. I’m doing it for my daughter this time. I had to take her out of a gymnastics class when I couldn’t do the required parent participation. Embarrassing when tiny moms are ding somersault and lifts with their kids and the instructor had to do it with my daughter. Ugh. Anyway thank you for sharing your journey.

    I do however have to tell you, it’s incredibly arrogant for you to state that “unlike other addictions” you have to “face your addiction every day.” After my fiance was murdered I also became a heroin addict. I’ve been clean since just before I got pregnant but I face that addiction EVERY SINGLE DAY. I don’t have to tell you that you only obsess over food when it’s in the room. Why would you think a drug or alcohol addict wouldn’t face that daily? I live in a suburb of Baltimore. I.know I can drive ten minutes on the beltway in any direction and had a needle in my vein in seconds. Same as knowing there is binge food in a grocer.

    Pain is pain is pain and I don’t believe in comparing pain ever. My worst pain is witnessing his murders. Someone else’s worst pain might be breaking their toe. That is their worst pain they have ever experienced. You just can’t compare it. All of us deal with it on a daily basis. All of us.

    • Hello Meeks,

      I appreciate you taking the time to respond and I do apologize for any offense I may have caused. I definitely understand that my pain and your pain, though different, are not comparable. When I meant that I face my addiction every day, I meant the fact that I still need food to live. I’m forced to confront my demons with every snack, every meal that I eat. I can’t go “cold turkey” with food. I can’t stop eating it. I can’t eradicate it from my life.

      A drug addiction is also a lifelong struggle and something you must face daily/hourly/minutely and I recognize that. I never meant to discredit it or make it sound like I feel my addiction is worse/better than yours. Good luck with your continued sobriety and the daily battle you face with your own demons. May we both be strengthened through our empathy for others and their own journeys.

  6. Thank you for the video. I understand and feel your pain; it’s mine too. While I am not bulimic, I have battled food addiction all of my life.

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